deadrezkids

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deadrezkids WHO WE ARE · HOMIES · self expression from the navajo reservation, some thoughts from a dead rez kid.
nitanahkohe:

Tillie Black Bear was an amazing and beautiful woman, who worked tirelessly to bring justice to Native women. Though her spirit is moving on, I know her legacy will continue to inspire generations of Native woman leaders. As a young woman just joining the movement to end violence against Native women, I feel blessed and honored to have such a woman to look up to. Prayers for her relatives and all who are grieving the passing of one the world’s truly bright lights—he’konetānȯhtse (be strong).
from the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center

Our beloved sister Tillie Black Bear passed over Saturday evening, July 19th, 2014. The NIWRC will forever hold Tillie in our hearts and honor her dedication to the safety of Native women and sovereignty for Indian nations. Tillie was known as the Grandmother of the Battered Women’s Movement for her leadership spanning almost four decades.
In 1978, as a young woman Tillie began her national movement building by testifying at the first US Commission on Civil Rights hearings on wife beating. The same year Tillie went on to lead in building organizations that continue to serve as houses of the movement – the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and the South Dakota Coalition Against Domestic & Sexual Violence. At the same time, Tillie organized on the Rosebud Indian Reservation serving as a founding mother to the White Buffalo Calf Woman Society and establishing the first Native women’s shelter in the United States.
For the next three decades Tillie’s leadership continued to indigenize federal legislation - VAWA, FVPSA and much more. In 1995, after passage of VAWA, Tillie met with DOJ to plant the seed that VAWA include Indian tribes. In 2000, Tillie helped shape the new VAWA tribal coalition program. In 2003, Tillie led a Wiping of the Tears Ceremony at the Senate building to launch the struggle for the VAWA ‘05 Safety for Indian Women Act. In 2011, as part of the NCAI Task Force, Tillie met with United Nation’s SR Manjoo as a pathway to the VAWA 2013 victory. This same year, Tillie provided leadership as one of the founders of the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center.
Tillie’s understanding of social change, organizing and movement building to make connections beyond the shelter doors to end violence against women are her living legacy. For these gifts we say thank you, and honor Tillie by continuing to take on our responsibilities to continue her organizing and movement buliding. And to her daughters Connie and Melissa and the entire family, we thank you for sharing your beloved mother, sister, Unci for all these many years.
Tillie was a true strong heart. And although our hearts ache, we encourage all who knew and loved Tillie to be strong hearted in the days and months and years to come. We are forever thankful for her love, guidance, leadership, vision, and friendship.
Journey well, our dear Tillie Black Bear.

nitanahkohe:

Tillie Black Bear was an amazing and beautiful woman, who worked tirelessly to bring justice to Native women. Though her spirit is moving on, I know her legacy will continue to inspire generations of Native woman leaders. As a young woman just joining the movement to end violence against Native women, I feel blessed and honored to have such a woman to look up to. Prayers for her relatives and all who are grieving the passing of one the world’s truly bright lights—he’konetānȯhtse (be strong).

from the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center

Our beloved sister Tillie Black Bear passed over Saturday evening, July 19th, 2014. The NIWRC will forever hold Tillie in our hearts and honor her dedication to the safety of Native women and sovereignty for Indian nations. Tillie was known as the Grandmother of the Battered Women’s Movement for her leadership spanning almost four decades.

In 1978, as a young woman Tillie began her national movement building by testifying at the first US Commission on Civil Rights hearings on wife beating. The same year Tillie went on to lead in building organizations that continue to serve as houses of the movement – the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence and the South Dakota Coalition Against Domestic & Sexual Violence. At the same time, Tillie organized on the Rosebud Indian Reservation serving as a founding mother to the White Buffalo Calf Woman Society and establishing the first Native women’s shelter in the United States.

For the next three decades Tillie’s leadership continued to indigenize federal legislation - VAWA, FVPSA and much more. In 1995, after passage of VAWA, Tillie met with DOJ to plant the seed that VAWA include Indian tribes. In 2000, Tillie helped shape the new VAWA tribal coalition program. In 2003, Tillie led a Wiping of the Tears Ceremony at the Senate building to launch the struggle for the VAWA ‘05 Safety for Indian Women Act. In 2011, as part of the NCAI Task Force, Tillie met with United Nation’s SR Manjoo as a pathway to the VAWA 2013 victory. This same year, Tillie provided leadership as one of the founders of the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center.

Tillie’s understanding of social change, organizing and movement building to make connections beyond the shelter doors to end violence against women are her living legacy. For these gifts we say thank you, and honor Tillie by continuing to take on our responsibilities to continue her organizing and movement buliding. And to her daughters Connie and Melissa and the entire family, we thank you for sharing your beloved mother, sister, Unci for all these many years.

Tillie was a true strong heart. And although our hearts ache, we encourage all who knew and loved Tillie to be strong hearted in the days and months and years to come. We are forever thankful for her love, guidance, leadership, vision, and friendship.

Journey well, our dear Tillie Black Bear.

(Source: divaneee, via heavychevyevy)

k1ssk1ng:

Power Lines is a politically charged coming of age story about a young Diné (Navajo) poet who runs away and finds home.

Klee is making a movie y’all. Help him out with a donation via the link to the campaign and/or reblog.

Support indigenous art!

(Source: indigenousaction.org)

blackhorselowe:

Bert & Weiwei // T I M E 2 0 1 4.

The official documentary of the T I M E (Temporary Installations Made for the Environment) 2014 project. Featuring the June 28th, 2014 collaboration between artists Ai Weiwei and Bert Benally, at Coyote Canyon, New Mexico, Navajo Nation.

A project of New Mexico Arts, International Land-Sensitive Art Foundation, the Skylark Foundation, and Navajo Nation Museum. Produced by D.E. Hyde & Blackhorse Lowe.

(Source: vimeo.com)

sikssaapo-p:

Floyd Red Crow Westerman and Buffy Sainte-Marie, among others.(x)

sikssaapo-p:

Floyd Red Crow Westerman and Buffy Sainte-Marie, among others.(x)

heterogeneoushomosexual:

Demian Diné Yazhi’Untitled (For We’Wha), 2014We’Wha (1849-1896)Zuni Lhamana
“When Europeans arrived in North America they were shocked that native peoples often interpreted gender differently from them. Not only were many cultures matriarchal, a great many tribes accepted three genders instead of only two. 

Zuni Pueblo, in western New Mexico, honored three genders before the coming of protestant missionaries. Men who chose not to become hunters and warriors became lhamanas, members of the alternative gender that bridged the other two. While they were initiated into male religious societies, they became crafts specialists and wore female garb. They were nonwarriors who moved freely in the male and female worlds.

We-wha was a Zuni lhamana who helped bridge his culture and that of Anglo-Americans. He was one of the first Zunis to experiment with new economic activities, something essential in the changing world of his day. He was a cultural ambassador for Zuni, traveling to Washington, D.C., where no one guessed he was not a woman in the many months he mixed with “high society” there. He assisted Anglo scholars who came to record the ways of his people, but he also resisted Anglo incursions when they seemed improper — once even ending up in jail. 

He was a deeply spiritual person. In this icon he is shown garbed as the man-woman kachina, Kolhamana, a role he filled during his life. His hands and face are painted ceremonially and he is ready to place the sacred mask upon his face. He was well loved throughout his life and his death brought grief to Zuni. The rainbow spirit above his head in the icon emphasizes that he is now one of the holy ones who return to his people with blessings. His photograph hangs in the tribal museum today, and gay Native Americans throughout North America remember him as a spiritual hero and guide."  // —Robert Lentz__________________________________________.

heterogeneoushomosexual:

Demian Diné Yazhi’
Untitled (For We’Wha), 2014

We’Wha (1849-1896)
Zuni Lhamana

When Europeans arrived in North America they were shocked that native peoples often interpreted gender differently from them. Not only were many cultures matriarchal, a great many tribes accepted three genders instead of only two. 

Zuni Pueblo, in western New Mexico, honored three genders before the coming of protestant missionaries. Men who chose not to become hunters and warriors became lhamanas, members of the alternative gender that bridged the other two. While they were initiated into male religious societies, they became crafts specialists and wore female garb. They were nonwarriors who moved freely in the male and female worlds.

We-wha was a Zuni lhamana who helped bridge his culture and that of Anglo-Americans. He was one of the first Zunis to experiment with new economic activities, something essential in the changing world of his day. He was a cultural ambassador for Zuni, traveling to Washington, D.C., where no one guessed he was not a woman in the many months he mixed with “high society” there. He assisted Anglo scholars who came to record the ways of his people, but he also resisted Anglo incursions when they seemed improper — once even ending up in jail. 

He was a deeply spiritual person. In this icon he is shown garbed as the man-woman kachina, Kolhamana, a role he filled during his life. His hands and face are painted ceremonially and he is ready to place the sacred mask upon his face. He was well loved throughout his life and his death brought grief to Zuni. The rainbow spirit above his head in the icon emphasizes that he is now one of the holy ones who return to his people with blessings. His photograph hangs in the tribal museum today, and gay Native Americans throughout North America remember him as a spiritual hero and guide."  // —Robert Lentz

__________________________________________.